Snowmobile Hauling


Snowmobile Hauling

Most Yukon residents can snowmobile from their front door, so trucking or trailering your snowmobile is often not required in the Yukon. However, using a truck or trailer to move your snowmobile around can greatly increase your options for snowmobiling destinations.

Snowmobiles can be safely hauled in the box of a pickup, on a flat deck, on a sled deck installed in a pickup, or on a wide variety of open or enclosed trailers. Each has advantages and disadvantages, so we recommend that you do some research and go with what works best for you.

Trucking or trailering your snowmobile is easy, but for the safety of yourself and other road users it’s important to follow some basic safety rules. If you’re new to hauling snowmobiles we recommend having an experienced snowmobiler give you a hand for your first time.

Below is a quick list of snowmobile hauling tips:


Trucking Snowmobiles:

When hauling snowmobiles on a truck…

  • Always use a truck that is appropriately sized for your load and rated for the weight you’re hauling.
  • Before you hit the road check your truck is in good roadworthy condition, tires are in good condition and winter rated, all lights are working properly, and all loads are secured.
  • If travelling out of town always bring plenty of fuel and warm clothing, carry an emergency kit with adequate supplies and equipment in case you break down or get stuck, and check the weather and road reports before you head out.
  • Use a proper ramp when loading snowmobiles.
    – Your ramp should be long enough to make a safe, comfortable angle to go up and down on.
    – Before you drive a snowmobile up or down a ramp always secure it to the truck or trailer so it can’t slide around or fall down.
    – Your ramp should allow your skis to slide easily and your track to grip firmly.
    – Several convenient styles of snowmobile loading ramps are widely available and reasonably priced, and they’re usually worth every penny.
  • When loading and unloading your snowmobile always wear a helmet and go slow. If you’re properly set up then going slow, smooth and steady will consistently provide the best results.
  • Once you’re done loading always properly secure your load with quality ratchet straps and/or other approved methods.
  • While driving keep in mind a loaded vehicle will handle differently and require longer distances to stop.

Trailering Snowmobiles:

When trailering snowmobiles, use the tips above and additionally:

  • Always use a trailer that is in good roadworthy condition, has good tires, is appropriately sized for your load, and is rated for the weight you will be hauling.
  • Always use a tow vehicle that is in good roadworthy condition and is properly equipped and rated for the weight you will be hauling.
  • Before you hit the road double check that your trailer is properly hooked up to the tow vehicle.
    – Trailer hitch and ball is the proper size for your trailer, is rated for the weight you’ll be hauling, is secured to the vehicle, and is an appropriate height for your particular truck and trailer combination
    – Trailer is hitched on and locked on
    – Safety chains are a suitable length and properly attached. It’s recommended to cross your chains so if the trailer tongue comes off the ball the chains will catch it and prevent it from digging into the road surface
    – Wiring is firmly plugged in with appropriate slack for turning corners
    – Lights are checked and confirmed to be working properly
    – Tow vehicle mirrors are adjusted as required
    – Trailer brakes, if equipped, are tested and adjusted as required
  • Some trailers have a tilting deck designed for loading snowmobiles, if yours does not have this then use a proper ramp for loading and unloading.
  • While driving a snowmobile on and off trailers always wear a helmet and go slow.
  • After loading always firmly secure all loads on your trailer with quality ratchet straps and/or other approved methods.
  • Make sure the weight of your load is properly distributed on the trailer, as an improperly balanced trailer can severely affect vehicle handling and is dangerous to other road users around you. A typical ball hitch trailer your tongue weight should be 10 to 15% of your overall trailer weight, and 15 to 30% for goose neck and 5th wheel trailers.
  • While driving keep in mind towing a trailer will often require you to take wider turns than normal, and also the additional weight of the trailer and its load will cause your vehicle will handle differently and require longer distances to stop.


This is just a quick reference guide. Check the regulations in your area and always follow the instructions and limitations found in the owners manual for your vehicles, trailers and snowmobiles.

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